Sniffle & Sneeze

I created Sniffle & Sneeze as an easy to use, practical remedy for the symptoms associated with colds and flus. It doesn’t taste great but is super effective to prevent a cold or flu from developing or it can be used to reduce the intensity of symptoms once the cold or flu has been around for a few days – especially body-aches, fever, sneezing and chills, and sore throat.

The herbs used in Sniffle and Sneeze are known for their antibacterial and antiviral properties and have been used for more than 2,500 years in Asian cultures to treat symptoms associated with the common cold, flu, sinusitis, and upper respiratory disorders. 

What’s in Sniffle & Sneeze?

The principle herbs Ban Lan Gen (Radix Isatidis), and Chuan Xin Lian (Radix Andrographis), are considered two of the most potent anti-viral herbs with the Chinese herbal medicine materia medica. Both are strong to reduce fever, relieve body-aches and to soothe a sore throat.

Xia Ku Cao (Spica Prunella) is included for its anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial qualities and Lian Qiao (Fructus Forsythia), and Bo He (Herba Menthae) also reduce fever and relieve symptoms associated with colds and flus.

How is it Prepared?

Prepared as a tincture, the herbs are soaked in grain or cane alcohol for a minimum of 30 days. This process extracts the active ingredients, creating an effective and potent preparation. Three dropperfuls of the tincture can be taken with 1 – 2 ounces of warm water up to 3 – 4 times per day.

I have used herbs like the ones in Sniffle & Sneeze for more than 20-years and have found that it is best taken at the onset of a cold or flu and regularly throughout the first 24-hours of experiencing symptoms. The formula is designed to stop the progression of symptoms and in some cases will prevent the onset of cold or flu if taken at the right time.

For more information about the herbs in any of my formulas, check out these vast reference texts!

Bensky, D., Clavey, S., Stoger, E., Gamble, A., (2004). Chinese Herbal Medicine Materia Medica, 3rd Edition. Eastland Press, Seattle, WA.
Cannon, C., (2016). The Contemporary Herbalist: Understanding Chinese Herbal Medicine Part I. Honolulu, HI.
Chen, J. K., Chen, T. T., & Crampton, L. (2004). Chinese medical herbology and pharmacology (Vol. 369). City of Industry, CA: Art of Medicine Press.

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